Hay sheds – what you need to know

6 July

Farmers building hay sheds are always seeking to maximise storage capacity in the most cost effective way.

At Steelcorp, we work with you to ensure you’re getting the shed you want and need.

Steelcorp Sales Consultant Aaron Barker says adding height to your hay shed is a great way to increase storage capacity.

“If you load your shed with a front-end loader, you can usually stack six large square bales or four round bales,” he says. “For large squares, a shed height of 6m would be optimal and 5.25m high works well for rounds.”

Telehandlers can give farmers extended reach when stacking bales, with the ability to stack up to eight bales, sometimes even more.

“We recommend seriously thinking about how many bales high you reasonably want to stack. Just because you can, doesn’t mean you should. It’s important to assess your available equipment and the skill level of staff when making this decision.

”If you want to stack seven large bales high, the shed would be 6.75m high jumping up to 7.5m high to accommodate eight bales high.”

When choosing bay widths for hay sheds Aaron says 8m bays are the most common size.

“We can work with you to do larger bays if that better suits your operation as well,” he says.

“We don’t build cookie-cutter sheds, we build what you and your business needs. Talk to us about what you require and we will work to get the results you need.”

An 8m bay allows three big 2.4m long square bales or five 1.5m wide round bales to be stored between the columns.

“This gives plenty of room to move bales in and out, without being wasteful, and allows sufficient airflow around the bales as well,” he says.

Aaron says many hay shed clients also choose to enclose three sides of their hay shed for extra weather protection.

“We look forward to discussing your hay shed requirements ahead of what should be a bumper spring for fodder production. Before you go, remember hot-dip galvanising comes as a standard here at Steelcorp, providing you with a strong, long lasting shed.”